John Cook, "Flowers on Red Table" Oil on Canvas 19 1/2 x 15 1/2

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John Cook, "Flowers on Red Table" Oil on Canvas 19 1/2 x 15 1/2

3,000.00

Framed Size: 28 1/2 x 24 1/2

A green tinted glass vase containing red flowers sits in the center of a table draped in red cloth. This still life is set against a grey, brown, and red tinted background.

Action and energy permeate the canvases of John Cook. There is a spontaneous nature to his paintings that conveys his need to quickly achieve the essence of light as it dances, pierces, careens and bounces to find its way throughout the subject. By drawing with brush rather than pencil, Cook achieves the loose and free style that characterizes his work. Never belabored, each painting reflects his passion to catch a mood with the interplay of light and shade.

A recent feature article in Southwest Art Magazine (July ’08) refer red to his style as showing “methodical spontaneity.” Cook states, “as for my style of painting, sometimes I feel the urgency to attack a canvas and capture the intensity of my emotions without adequate descriptive detail necessary for the image to be recognizable as representational art. Eventually I return to the canvas and bring the vision to some semblance of clarity.” As a young adult, John was first exposed to the works of Nicholai Fechin, whose impact and influence continues today. Other influences include John Singer Sargent’s direct, fluid strokes, which inspired the spontaneous dashes of paint that give John’s works their
dramatic surfaces and energetic compositions, Henry Fatin Latour’s still life and floral paintings, which bring strong influences for color, texture, and composition, and F rank Brangwyn and Winslow Homer’s watercolors. Today John incorporates similar elements into his work and refuses to limit himself in subject matter.

F rom still life to portraits and landscapes, architecture, and his native-Texas western imagery, nothing is too small or too large for John to attempt as is demonstrated in his diverse range of subject matter. T rips to London, Paris, Bruges, Venice, Rome, Florence, Portofino, St. Marguerite, San F rancisco and New York have inspired many of Cook’s paintings and three one-man exhibitions at Dallas’ Victorian Gallery, several showings at Whistle Pik Gallery in F rederickburg, Texas, The Turquoise Tortoise Gallery in Tubac, Arizona, as well as Galerie Amsterdam in Carmel, California. Recently in 2009, Cook’s eighth annual one-man show was held at the Southwest Gallery in Dallas. In November of
the same year John joined the Shaw Gallery in Naples F lorida. John’s work has also shown at London’s prestigious W.H. Patterson Gallery, with members of Parliament attending.

John was born in Dallas, Texas and attended school at the University of Texas at Arlington and the Art Center School in Los Angeles, where he received a Bachelor of Professional Arts Degree. He mar ried his loving and supportive wife, Jean, in 1970 and has two children, Josh and Jade. John is also a proud “Papa” of three grandchildren, Asher, Shiloh and Avery. A deeply spiritual and devoted family man, Cook insists, “Painting is
not the most important thing, but I consider the ability to pursue painting for a living truly a special gift and blessing from God. I regard Jesus, God’s Son, the most important being in my life!”

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