Eugene Galien-Laloue, "River Scene" Oil on Canvas, 19 1/4 x 25 3/4

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Eugene Galien-Laloue, "River Scene" Oil on Canvas, 19 1/4 x 25 3/4

16,000.00

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Framed size is 29 x 35 inches

Eugene Galien Laloue, one of the most acknowledged painters of Paris, was born and lived most of his life in Montmartre. Born in 1854 to Charles Laloue, a set-designer working for a Parisian theatre, he was the oldest of nine children. Admiring his father's work, Laloue became interested in art when he was very young and, except for a brief period spent in the army, he never traveled anywhere without his brushes and paints.

Galien Laloue was fortunate to live in Paris at a very exciting time for the city. Paris was being rebuilt and modernized and changed during the artist's lifetime. His paintings are an accurate record of those fascinating changes. Baron Georges-Eugene Haussman, appointed Prefect of the Seine, started the city's vast revitalization project, which included demolishing old houses and building wide boulevards without which one could not imagine Paris as seen today. It is estimated Haussman transformed 60% of Paris' buildings. Notably, he redesigned the Place de l'Etoile and created long avenues giving perspectives on monuments such as the Arc de Triomphe and the Opera Garnier.

In 1874, the French Railway lines employed Galien Laloue. The company was expanding its network from Paris to most parts of France and needed an illustrator to travel and paint the new section of the rail network. This opportunity gave Galien Laloue a chance to travel to the French provinces. Every day, once his rail paintings were finished, he started his own work - his vistas of French country scenes and landscapes.

Galien-Laloue was quite popular and his paintings sold very well. He was loved not only by the French, but also by American and British collectors. Obsessive about his painting - his only interest - in his private life he craved simplicity. He outlived three wives, and all of his sisters, who had been his neighbors. He did not seek fame or academic recognition - he sold his work only to make a living, always asking for payment in advance so as not to complicate matters, and he had contracts with several art dealers to insure a secure income for himself.

Varied pseudonyms for Galien-Laloue included: J. Lieven (Jacques Lievin)as seen here, E. Galiany (an Italiante version of the name) and L. Dupuy. Laloue had four children, two of whom died at an early age. After breaking his arm in 1940 while being evacuated to Bordeaux during World War II, Laloue was not able to paint any longer and died a few months later at the age of 87.

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